Biotechnology and Bioprocess Engineering 2021; 26(1): 25-38  
Self-assembled Viral Nanoparticles as Targeted Anticancer Vehicles
Yuanzheng Wu, Jishun Li, and Hyun-Jae Shin
Yuanzheng Wu, Jishun Li
Ecology Institute, Qilu University of Technology (Shandong Academy of Sciences), Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology, Jinan 250103, China
Hyun-Jae Shin*
Department of Biochemical and Polymer Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju 61452, Korea
Tel: +82-62-230-7518, Fax: +82-62-230-7226
E-mail: shinhj@chosun.ac.kr
Received: December 8, 2020; Revised: January 4, 2021; Accepted: January 6, 2051; Published online: February 28, 2021.
© The Korean Society for Biotechnology and Bioengineering. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Viral nanoparticles (VNPs) comprise a variety of mammalian viruses, plant viruses, and bacteriophages, that have been adopted as building blocks and supramolecular templates in nanotechnology. VNPs demonstrate the dynamic, monodisperse, polyvalent, and symmetrical architectures which represent examples of such biological templates. These programmable scaffolds have been exploited for genetic and chemical manipulation for displaying of targeted moieties together with encapsulation of various payloads for diagnosis or therapeutic intervention. The drug delivery system based on VNPs offer diverse advantages over synthetic nanoparticles, including biocompatibility, biodegradability, water solubility, and high uptake capability. Here we summarize the recent progress of VNPs especially as targeted anticancer vehicles from the encapsulation and surface modification mechanisms, involved viruses and VNPs, to their application potentials.
Keywords: viral nanoparticles (VNPs), self-assembly, anticancer, drug delivery, nanotechnology


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